The Korea Herald

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지나쌤

Landslides, flooding damage 39 cultural heritage properties

By Park Yuna

Published : July 17, 2023 - 16:12

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The Hoeryongpo Meandering Stream, which is damaged due to heavy rain, in Yecheon, North Gyeongsang Province (CHA) The Hoeryongpo Meandering Stream, which is damaged due to heavy rain, in Yecheon, North Gyeongsang Province (CHA)

Continued heavy rainfall has left 39 cultural heritage properties damaged across the nation as of Monday morning, according to the Cultural Heritage Administration. Among the 39 damaged sites and artifacts reported by the CHA are one national treasure and two treasures.

Josadang Shrine at Buseoksa, located in Bonghwangsan in Yeongju, South Gyeongsang Province, saw soil erosion damage at the temple's main entrance caused by the heavy rain. The shrine has been designated a national treasure in 1962. Buseoksa, which attracts numerous tourists each year, is renowned as one of the oldest timber structures in the country. The Buddhist temple was constructed during the Goryeo Kingdom (918-1392).

Two treasures -- a three-story stone pagoda in Yeonggwang, South Jeolla Province, and a stone seated Buddha at Cheongnyongsa in Yecheon, South Gyeongsang Province -- were also damaged due to flooding and landslide, and are currently under restoration process.

Emergency measures were taken to protect the reported damaged cultural sites. Public access is also currently restricted to these locations, the CHA reported.

Torrential rain over the past few days flooded Gongsanseong Fortress in Gongju, South Chungcheong Province, on Saturday. The fortress, designated as a historic site, was built some 1,500 years ago in the city of the ancient capital of Baekje between AD 475 and 538. Only the roof part of the Manharu Pavilion, a UNESCO World Heritage site, could be seen above water.

The government’s allocated budget for restoring cultural heritage for this monsoon season is set at 1.1 billion won, the CHA stated. The CHA announced that it would cooperate with local governments to take necessary follow-up measures, while keeping an eye on further damage reports of cultural heritage properties.